DELHI TOWNSHIP (Lansing State Journal) — A 6-year-old Holt child who police say was critically injured by his mother’s boyfriend had whipping marks on his feet, legs, back and buttocks, facial fractures and severe brain trauma when he arrived at the hospital, according to police.

The whipping marks were “too numerous to count,” Ingham County Sheriff’s Department Detective Kelly Bowden testified in a hearing that led to criminal charges against the boy’s mother’s long-term boyfriend, Quintiene Campbell.

The child had fractures on his face, broken ribs, holes in both lungs and bruising on his eye, Bowden said. Doctors didn’t think he would make it through surgery. He survived, but doctors told police the damage is irreversible, Bowden said.

Injuries may be consistent with someone stomping on the boy, Bowden testified.

Police found the boy in the early morning hours of August 16, 2020 lying on his back in the living room, unresponsive and struggling to breathe, Bowden said. His pupils were dilated and fixed, and he didn’t react to light in his eyes. He had bruises on his face, arm and thigh, some of which were finger-like.

His 7-year-old brother had whipping marks on his back, buttocks and the back of his legs, Bowden said. He had healing and scabbed cuts on his chest and finger marks on his throat. Bowden said the boy told police Campbell strangled both children.

Campbell, 30, is charged with multiple counts of first- and third-degree child abuse. His attorney, Duane Silverthorne, declined to comment. He is being held in the Ingham County jail without bond.

While Campbell initially told police the 6-year-old had fallen down the stairs, a neighbor said she heard slamming, yelling, crying and screaming that sounded “murderous” coming from next door, Bowden testified. The sounds traveled between multiple rooms and were so violent she told police she could feel the impacts rattling the walls.

That went on for two or three hours, the neighbor told police. She did not contact law enforcement during that time, Bowden said.

Minutes after the neighbor said she heard the commotion stop, Campbell called police, Bowden testified. It was about 3:30 a.m., and about seven minutes after Campbell called the boys’ mom and told her she needed to come home. The mom said Campbell never told her the 6-year-old had fallen down the stairs, or that he was injured.

Later, Campbell told police he had been angry with the boys because they snuck food down to the basement at about midnight and made a mess, Bowden said. He told police he used a belt to whip both boys. He couldn’t say how many times.

“Things were so heated up he just wasn’t even sure how many times he whipped them,” Bowden testified.

Campbell said he’d previously disciplined the boys by spanking, swatting them, cuffing them upside the head and taking away privileges, but he “just wasn’t reaching them,” Bowden testified. He was not allowed by their mother to discipline the boys in any way other than assigning extra homework or chores.

“He was so enraged at that point that he figured this was the next, I guess, step in the process,” Bowden said.

Police found an oval-shaped dent in the drywall upstairs, about the height of one of the boys’ heads hitting the wall, he said.

The sheriff’s office investigated the family in February after receiving a complaint about abuse, Bowden said. The boys did not disclose the abuse, so Bowden testified he didn’t have the proof needed to continue the investigation.